Democracy rox lol wtf

This morning's assignment, after learning about the legal regulations on the use of force (found in Chapter VII of the UN Charter, as I'm sure you know), was for each student to e-mail their analysis of the March 2003 use of force to president@whitehouse.gov (with me cc'd). They seemed excited and nervous about the idea of e-mailing the president, so I didn't have the heart to break it to them that if anyone reads their letters at all, it'll be some bored summer intern. I did promise 1,000 extra credit bonus points to anyone that gets something other than canned, computer-generated response, so I'll keep you posted.

5 comments:

towwas said...

Aw, cute! My mom volunteered for a while in the White House answering children's mail to the president. Basically, yeah, every single one got a canned response (although they were all coded by hand and entered into the computer by volunteer ladies). But they picked a handful every week to show to the president. Different president, though - I think each administration pretty much gets to make these policies up for itself.

grrrbear said...

Yeah, this president probably only looks at letters from children who are writing threatening messages in order to acertain their threat level and have them locked up as "underage potential combatants".

J.Po said...

I might just do your assignment too! Maybe I'll get a second grader to write out my letter to increase the likelihood of getting a response. Is it still possible to send actual written letters (on paper) to the prez?

Spice said...

All the correspondence is also filed at the presidential libraries after someone leaves office - as TOWWAS notes, they are pretty diligent about cataloging it! That was one of the fun things about doing archival research - being able to look at kids' letters to the president.

And yes, I think it's still possible to send a handwritten note! Handwritten notes have a much higher response rate, in general, than e-mails to elected officials...

towwas said...

I bet all the letters on paper get irradiated now.