No one appreciates my art

I realized tonight that my students and I have wildly different conceptions of a good lecture. I was stoked about tonight's lecture on third-party intervention - it had excellent flow and rhythm, good symmetry of examples and theory and readings, just the right balance of powerpoint to talking, and the components (of which there were neither too many to be overwhelming nor too few to be unmanageable) not only fit well with one another but with the previous weeks of material and with the overall goals of the course. In a word - scrumptious. My students couldn't have been more bored. I resorted to telling them my hiiiiilarrrious story of visiting Tim Horton's in Windsor, Ontario just so they would react to something.

Oh well - I suppose it's not THE END OF THE WORLD!!! (Props to LittleSisterBro for the link)

6 comments:

Mister Vertigo said...

I LOVE that cartoon. I have seen it before, but it was most certanly worth wacthing again.

Burrito Eater said...

Wait a minute, you have a story about visiting Tim Horton's in Windsor? I've been to it no less than 4 times myself. I found the best way to get through customs quickly is when they ask what the purpose of your trip was to say Tim Hortons! Oh by the way your respectability factor in my book went up one point. Remember art is subjective! :) That's my new answer to everything it is either subjective or relative.

Spice said...

That's hi-laaaar-i-ous!

Well, not the lecture. The Tim Horton's part.

Sophist said...

Strange, isn't it? I have learned that no matter how hard I work on a talk, 1/3 of the people in the audience will be asleep. Even if it's the best talk I've ever given. I also realized that I fall asleep all the time in seminars, even when they're fascinating!

towwas said...

Yeah, I'm a lecture-sleeper, too. Doesn't matter how interesting they are. I went to North Carolina to interview a professor a few weeks ago, and I fell asleep in her class. Yep. It was an interesting class, too, and I think one could easily argue that I had a strong interest in presenting myself as a respectable, alert human. But there I was - asleep in the back.

Spice said...

Some article J.Bro, AFR, and I read when preparing to lecture talked about how the maximum attention span in a lecture is about 20 minutes. I've never fallen asleep in a lecture (hell, I can't fall asleep in my bed at night), but have done my fair share of note-writing and staring into space. I try to break things up when I lecture, but sometimes there's just nothing you can think of to do with that many people. I definitely know, however, that I will never teach a 2-hour grad seminar without having a break in the middle!